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March 25

Unofficial Collaborators: Recovering Charlotte von Mahlsdorf. With Polly Thistlethwaite and Liz Snyder

Photo by Mara Valderrama

Monday, March 25
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Lecture, Archive + Performance

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Polly Thistlethwaite plunges into the archive with her partner Liz Snyder to explore true story representations of Berlin’s queer heroine, raconteur, and museum curator, Charlotte von Mahlsdorf. This lecture-performance invites audiences to speculate about the ephemerality and vulnerability of a queer archive, and the consequences of faking one. It is marked by uncertainty, overwhelm, and conflicting curiosities that serious researchers encounter.

The work surveils Doug Wright’s 2004 prize winning play I Am My Own Wife, a thickly documented, staged portrait of Charlotte von Mahlsdorf. It engages narratives introduced by Mahlsdorf’s (auto)biography Ich bin meine eigne Frau (written with historian Peter Süß) and the biographical film I Am My Own Woman (English trans.) by Rosa von Praunheim, both produced in 1992.
This investigation is incomplete, and it invites evidence to emerge. It exposes relevant, fabricated, and tangential documentation displayed using vintage and contemporary technologies.

Photo credit Andrew Snyder

Polly Thistlethwaite is Professor and Chief Librarian at the Graduate Center, CUNY, in New York City. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, while working in academic libraries, Polly also worked with the Lesbian Herstory Archives and the AIDS activist group ACT UP. Liz Snyder is a musician and performer who teaches elementary school music in Brooklyn, New York.

Start: Mar 25, 2019
End: Mar 25, 2019
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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April 15

2019 DTSA Booth Award: Honoring Ishmael Houston-Jones

Monday, April 15
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Award Ceremony

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Photo by Eric McNatt

Ishmael Houston-Jones: choreographer, author, performer, teacher, and curator. His improvised dance and text work has been performed in New York, across the US, and in Europe, Canada, Australia, and Latin America. He and Fred Holland shared a New York Dance and Performance “Bessie” Award for Cowboys, Dreams and Ladders. He was awarded his second “Bessie” Award for the revival of THEM, his 1985/86 collaboration with writer Dennis Cooper and composer Chris Cochrane. He curated Platform 2012: Parallels and Platform 2016: Lost & Found, both at Danspace Project. He has received a 2016 Herb Alpert, a 2015 Doris Duke Impact and a 2013 Foundation for Contemporary Arts Artists Awards. In 2017 he received a third “Bessie” for Variations on Themes from Lost and Found: Scenes from a Life and other Works by John Bernd.

Houston-Jones’s performance works and curatorial projects attend to the urgent materiality of the sexed, raced, desiring body on stage. As an educator, Houston-Jones has passed down improvisational techniques and practices that are both artistically experimental and that helped maintain and perpetuate experimental dance during periods of embodied and economic crisis. Through the 2009 re-staging of THEM and his curatorial and choreographic work on the Danspace Platform 2016: Lost & Found, Houston-Jones has ensured that a new generation of dance artists inherit the kinesthetic legacy of the early AIDS epidemic’s impact on the New York dance community. He has simultaneously nurtured the development of new work by young dance artists, especially those who are queer and/or of color. In recognition of his outstanding oeuvre as a performer and choreographer, as well as his commitment to the legacy and continuation of experimental performance practices through his curatorial and pedagogical practices, the Doctoral Theatre Students’ Association of the CUNY Graduate Center is proud to present Ishmael Houston-Jones with the 2019 Booth Award.

 

Organized by Ashley Marinaccio and Janet Werther

 

Start: Apr 15, 2019
End: Apr 15, 2019
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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April 29

Harry Newman’s Dry Time

Monday, April 29
Segal Theatre
4:00pm Reading | 6:30pm Panel

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

Heat. The sun bearing down. People in line for food, for water at temporary camps. Elsewhere, a party, as if nothing’s changed in the world. A novelist is being celebrated. Set against a background of environmental collapse and economic crisis in the Midwestern US, Dry Time explores the personal and social consequences of intensifying climate change in an increasingly authoritarian society. Conceived as a narrative symphony, each scene is two scenes that overlap and play out simultaneously, revealing the contrasts and connections of those most affected by environmental events (mainly in patrolled encampments) and those largely untouched by events in their private homes. What happens when they come together?

Written in the early 1990s, Dry Time is most likely the first global warming related play. Considered too distant, abstract, and forbidding at the time, it now approaches realism. Informed by the original UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report and other studies, Dry Time builds on the impacts of climate catastrophe already apparent and takes them to an unflinching conclusion.

Photo by Ewa Orzech

Harry Newman’s plays include The Occupation, Dry Time, The Dark, and a translation of Patrick Süskind’s The Double Bass, and have been presented at the Contemporary American Theater Festival, The Public Theater, BACA/Downtown, the Guggenheim Works & Process series, and other theaters around the U.S. as well as, most recently, in Germany. Widely published as a poet, his work has appeared in Ecotone, Rattle, Asheville Poetry Review, and The New Guard, among many other journals. In 2016, a collection of his political poetry, Led from a Distance, was published by Louisiana Literature Press. Before working in theater, Harry studied Chemistry and Mathematics at MIT. More information is available at www.harrynewman.com.

Start: Apr 29, 2019
End: Apr 29, 2019
Venue: Segal Theatre
Category:
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May 13

Screening Performance, Performing Screens: New Projections in Theatre and Media

Photo provided by DTSA

Monday, Tuesday May 13, 14
Segal Theatre

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

May 13 | 4:30pm Panel + Performance | Segal Theatre
May 14 | All Day Panels + Performances | Segal Theatre

The Doctoral Theatre Students’ Association 2019 Conference
Opening Remarks by Edward Miller & Keynote by Sarah Bay-Cheng

In the streets, in our homes, in our hands; in public and private; in work, leisure, and social relations; ubiquitous and invisible, tangible or porous, screens are constructing a new reality. Artistic practices and critical theories are rapidly evolving to address this change of paradigm in communication, perception, and being. Gathering scholars and artists from multiple disciplines around the trope of the screen with its multiple resonances, Screening Performance, Performing Screens will reflect on the many collisions of theatre, performance, film, and other audiovisual media in scholarly, artistic, pedagogical, or performance-as-research works that engage with and challenge meanings of the word “screen,” as both noun and verb. How can historical conceptualizations of screens help us broaden the concept beyond the context of new media and interactive technologies? How has engagement with and on screens expanded or reshaped production and distribution of art and knowledge? In what ways have reception(s), spectatorship(s), and the discourses of marginalization been molded by screens?

Organized by Kyueun Kim, Curtis Russell, Christine Snyder, and Mara Valderrama.

Start: May 13, 2019
End: May 14, 2019
Venue: segal theatre
Category:
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May 16

Pathetic: Staging Women’s Desire with Julia Jarcho and Minor Theater

Minor Theatre
Photo by Minor Theatre

Thursday, May 16
Segal Theatre
6:30pm Reading + Panel

FREE + Open to public. First come, first served.

“I felt my whole body, and it was burning.”

This June, downtown NYC company Minor Theater presents Pathetic, a new take on Racine’s classic Phèdre at Abrons Arts Center. Racine’s queen destroys everything with her monstrous lust; in Pathetic, neoclassical hexameter meets contemporary teen drama as the heroine becomes a bored mom with an ax to grind. In anticipation of the premiere, OBIE-winning playwright/director Julia Jarcho invites fellow artists to consider what can happen when women’s desire gets a voice onstage. What new forms become possible when women appropriate the conjunction of sex and violence, which has traditionally been directed against us? How do we forge a lustful stage poetics of our own? And come to think of it, who is this “we”? The evening will feature readings from Jarcho’s plays, including Pathetic and Grimly Handsome (2013), followed by a discussion with choreographer, performer, and writer Okwui Okpokwasili (MacArthur Fellow, 2018) and other avant-garde luminaries, moderated by Frank Hentschker.

Start: May 16, 2019
End: May 16, 2019
Venue: segal theatre
Category:
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